Little India


Singapore, the island nation is the smallest country in Southeast Asia. Singapore is the home to a number of tourist attractions and Little India is definitely one of them. Little India, which is nestled at the eastern side of the Singapore River, is actually one of the favorite tourist sites of the people of Indian origin.

The place has made all the efforts to retain the rich cultural elements of India. It connects the Bukit Timah Sungei Road and the Rochor Canal Road and the Petain Road of Little India that was built in the year 1916 and has been named after Henri Petain, a renowned French Marshal.

In the late 19th century, many Indian migrants came to Singapore to find work and settled here. Spreading out from both sides of Serangoon Road, the little enclave of the Indian community became known as Little India. Find colorful temples co-exist side by side with churches and mosques. Discover an array of shops selling Indian silks, brass ware, bangles, spices and flowers.

Be sure to stop at the excellent restaurants serving North and South Indian cuisine. Little India is adorned with the cottage industry and other commercial industries and especially for the Indians this is the best place to be, as at this place one would find Indian clothes and Indian food If you are an Indian and if this is your first visit to Singapore and if you are feeling low and depressed, then just, make a trip to this place to

surprise yourself, as Little India is truly India away from India.

Little India, Singapore is full of Indian charm and tradition.

This Area of Singapore has a distinct Indian identity to it which is depicted by the scent of the Indian spices, display of rich silk saris in bright colors, shops which display and sell silver ware, brass ware, ethnic jewelry and wood carvings etc. For locating typical Indian stuff in Singapore, always head to Little India and its nearby areas. The Serangoon Road is famous for its well mixed and ready spices for to be used in preparing fish or meat or vegetable curry.

For shopping in jewelry stuff, one can shop for silver amulets, bridal jewelry, ankle chain, bangles in assorted colors here as well. The Chellas gallery deals in handicrafts and collectibles from Kashmir especially Papier Mache boxes. Whilst shopping around here, one can come across lovely Indian bedspreads, huge posters of favorite Indian film stars which can be most tempting to buy.

If you look into the history of Little India, you would be aware of the fact that it was previously established as a settlement primarily for the convicts. Since it was nestled near the Serangoon River, the local residents of Singapore found this place to be aptly suited for trade related to livestock and cattle raising purposes.Towards the beginning of the 20th century this area got developed and adopted a new look in the sense that it acquired the appearance of an area that was Indian in every way. The Tekka Centre on Buffalo Road is also called as the KK Market by the locals. This market sells most of its stuff as fresh as possible. So look around and shop for fresh vegetables, fish, flowers, spices and meat. Some of the tiny shops stock small brass ware items which could be given away as souvenirs.

Visit the site www.focussingapore.com to learn more about the Little India. Little India Arcade, located at 48 Serangoon Rd., between Campbell La. and Hastings Rd., Little India, Singapore is a very popular arcade. This arcade is housed in a restored Art Deco styled shop house which comprises of food stores specializing in such as North Indian cuisines, South Indian cuisines and Bangladeshi cuisines as well. The small souvenir stalls located just outside make brisk business by selling incense sticks, herbal oils, Indian snacks and friend lentils etc. Shopping in Little India proves to be delightful and an amazing experience.


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